The 15 Biggest LGBTQ+ YouTubers

blog header lgbtq youtubers
  • Alex Lefkowitz
    (Author)

    Alex Lefkowitz is the founder and CEO of Tasty Edits. He holds a BA in Entrepreneurship and is an experienced video editor, having edited hundreds of videos for dozens of creators before starting his own video editing company. Since launching Tasty Edits, he has directly managed thousands of video and thumbnail orders. Now, he draws on his experience working with professional creators to write about video editing, the creator economy, and video marketing. You can also read his work on Hackernoon and Medium. Plus, he's contributed several expert opinions in interviews and articles as a guest on platforms like Jotform.

    View all posts

Since YouTube first launched and creators started to gather fans, a large and thriving community of LGBTQ+ YouTubers has emerged. 

Some of them started out tackling dedicated queer themes in their videos. Others create a diverse content in different niches and rarely bring up their sexual identities. 

Some launched their channel and shared their identity from the start. Others came out somewhere down the road. 

In this article, we take a look at the biggest YouTubers active in the LGBTQ+ community, what they identify as, and what content they create. 

Note: We’re only including creators who are consistently active on YouTube. Creators like Jeffrey Starr and Lilly Singh, who only post occasionally, are not listed. 

Contents

number 1 one icon

Greg and Mitch

Topping our list are Mitchel Moffit and Gregory Brown, a dynamic YouTuber duo who runs two channels: Greg and Mitch and AsapSCIENCE. Both identify as gay.  

Overall, the couple has over 11.3 million subs, 10.6 million on their science channel and 780 K on their personal channel. 

AsapSCIENCE tackles a diverse range of science topics, from the impact of various drugs on the human body, over Covid-19 facts, to the mental health impact of cell phones. It also features science songs (helping you memorize the first 100 digits of π and the periodic table), a podcast, and a YouTube Originals Series which features experiments like generating electricity from bike power and heating a bathtub with manure. 

On Greg and Mitch, the couple covers more personal topics. They upload vlogs, explore curious questions and debate science. Several videos focus on homosexuality – whether you can get rid of it, whether gay men are particularly funny, and what the hardest part about being gay is.

Greg and Mitch is a more personal and much more queer-focused channel than ASAPscience.

🥳 Get more subscribers

And earn more money with this free resource! 💰
number 2 two icon

Bretman Rock

Next up is Bretman Rock, a nonbinary gay YouTuber with over 8.8 million subs. He kickstarted his career as a creator in 2015, when his makeup tutorials went viral on YouTube and Vine. 

Based in Hawaii, he now makes a wide range of videos, many of which feature his sister as well as collaborations with other YouTubers. After filming a YouTube Originals Series – 30 Days With Bretman Rock – he took a break from creating videos but recently returned to YouTube. 

Some of his videos have an explicit LGBTQ+ focus, or raise funds to help benefit organizations such as the Family Equality Council.

Bretman focuses on beauty content, with a heavy queer slant.

number 3 three icon

LDShadowLady

Coming up next is Elizabeth “Lizzie” Dwyer, aka LDShadowLady, who identifies as bi and has over 7.2 million subs on her gaming channel.

Her content centers around Minecraft, as well as Crazy Craft 3.0, Shadowcraft, Mini-Games, and various indie games. She came out as bi in 2021 on Twitter after MCC Pride, an annual charity event that forms part of the Minecraft Championship and raises money for the Trevor Project, a suicide prevention nonprofit that focuses on queer youth.

number four new icon

Tana Mongau

In fourth place on the list of the biggest active LGBTQ+ YouTubers is Tana Mongeau, who identifies as pan. Tana has over 5.4 million subs and her channel features beauty and fashion content as well as vlogs detailing her life as an influencer, from going to Coachella to fake-marrying Logan Paul.

She first talked about her sexuality in depth in June 2020, when she came out as “pansexual as hell” on Twitter, following up with a longer post on Instagram. Before that, she had already dated Bella Thorne, the actor and singer of Disney Channel fame.

Tana Mongeau’s life as an online influencer attracts millions of viewers.

number 5 five icon

Connor Franta

With 4.8 million subs, Connor Franta comes in fifth place. He launched his channel all the way back in 2010, featuring vlog content and pop culture commentary. 

Connor came out as gay in a video in late 2014, after denying rumors about his sexuality for years, even making a video stating that he was straight (which he reviews in the video below). 

Since his coming out, however, a lot of Connor’s content has been LGBTQ+ and mental health-centric, giving tips on how you can tell if boys like you, reviewing gay dating apps, reacting to Heartstopper, and summing up 10 years of therapy in 10 minutes.

Connor bemused by his oblivious past self.

number 6 six icon

MacDoesIt

Coming up next on our list of the biggest LGBTQ+ YouTubers is Machaizelli Kahey, a satirical comedic vlogger who identifies as gay and has over 2.5 million subs on his channel. He describes his own content as being a “cross between intelligently funny and an organized hot mess”. Besides pop culture reviews, he also does challenges and storytimes. 

Many of his videos feature gay themes, from reacting to anti-gay commercials or asking an AI to make gay cocktails to turning pointless gendered products gay. 

Mac calls his content a “cross between intelligently funny and an organized hot mess.”

number 7 seven icon

Max Miller

Another creator who is gay himself but whose content focus is elsewhere is Max Miller. His food-focused channel Tasting History, which can boast over 2.3 million subs, focuses on testing out ancient recipes and exploring the history of different dishes, from ancient Egyptian spiral bread to making medieval mead.

Max married his longtime partner Jose Mendoza in 2021.

number 8 eight icon

Caitlin and Leah

The first lesbian entry in our list of the biggest LGBTQIA+ YouTubers are Caitlin and Leah, whose YouTube channel has over 2 million subs. It features vlogs, couple’s advice and pranks. Recent content has been focused on their growing family.

After being together for over 8 years, the couple recently welcomed their first child, Oakley. They conceived using IVF, with Leah carrying one of Caitlin’s eggs fertilized with sperm from a donor.

Caitlin and Leah are now a family of three.

number 9 nine icon

Julie and Camilla

Another lesbian couple on the list are Julie and Camilla, with over 1.9 million subs. They launched their channel back in 2015 and feature a diverse range of content, from travel and workout to food and couple’s content. 

Julie and Camilla began to identify as queer later in life, when they fell in love at 30 after being best friends. They are now married and, like Caitlin and Leah, conceived through IVF and started their own family.  

Julie and Camilla’s fast-forward through their relationship.

numbers icons 10 ten

Hank Green

Next on our list of LGBTQ+ YouTubers is Hank Green, a long-time internet celebrity who only came out as bi in 2023, though rumors about his sexuality had persisted for years. 

Hank made his YouTube debut in 2007, together with his brother John on their channel Vlogbrothers. They kicked their channel off with the Brotherhood 2.0 project, in which they only communicated through videos for a year. Since then, the channel has evolved and now features a mix of science content and vlogs. 

Hank, who has a BS in biochemistry and an MS in environmental studies also runs a channel focused on educational videos and science communication, CrashCourse. It covers topics from plant anatomy to how to choose a college. While Hank appears in many videos, a large number of others feature specialists in different disciplines, many from Arizona State University. 

On his personal channel, Hank has 1.77 million subs and features mostly vlog content and various ponderings on pop culture, politics, and science. 

Hank came out as bi casually, in a comment on a Twitter post about Ryan Reynolds.

number icon 11 eleven

Jessie Paege

Jessie Paege is a US-based YouTuber whose content focuses on mental health, the LGBTQ+ community, and music. She has gathered an audience of over 1.7 million subs. 

A lot of Jessie’s content is centered around queer content, from covering transphobic influencers to reacting to gay thirst traps. 

Jessie’s own sexuality has been less well-defined over the years. She identified as bi at one point and gave her pronouns as she/they, but recently reflected that her journey of self-discovery as a member of the queer community is far from over.

The latest of several updates along Jessie’s gender and sexuality jorney.

number icon 12 twelve

Hbomberguy

The next bisexual creator on our list is Harry Michael Brewis, aka Hbomberguy, a British YouTuber who does deep-dives into topics ranging from vaccines to climate change deniers. One of his most successful videos so far was an exposé on YouTube plagiarism in which he exposed James Somerton for stealing the content for his video essays, resulting in the deletion of Somerton’s channel. 

Hbomberguy came out as bisexual in 2018 in a post on CuriousCat and Twitter, though he notes that he’s “one of those bi men who leans pretty strongly toward women”.  

Currently, his channel has over 1.68 million subs.

number icon 13 thirteen

Davey Wavey

Among gay creators on our list, few focus more on LGBTQIA+ themes than Davey Wavey on his channel wickydkewl, which currently tallies in at 2.64 million subs. Davey is also a creator on Himeros, an erotic website for gay and bisexual men. 

His content on YouTube is geared towards MLM, featuring Q&As with gay porn stars and models, instructions for threesomes, nipple play, and behind-the-scenes looks at gay porn shoots.

Davey Wavey’s video Q&A with a gay model. 

number icon 14 fourteen

Abigail Thorn

The next creator on our list is Abigail Thorn, a trans-fem lesbian whose channel, Philosophy Tube, can boast 1.56 million subs. 

Abigail started her channel over 10 years ago, before she transitioned. Her content focuses on different branches of philosophy, as well as the work of a wide range of different philosophers throughout the ages.

In some of her videos, she takes a look at LGBTQ+ subjects through the lens of philosophy. For instance, she analyzed transphobia through the lens of Greek Skepticism.

Philosophy Tube is known for in-depth but accessible video essay analyses like this one.

number icon 15 fifteen

Jessica Kellgren-Fozard

Rounding out our list is Jessica Kellgren-Fozard, a creator who focuses on vintage fashion, living with a disability, and LGBTQ+ themes. Her channel currently has 1.13 million subscribers.

Her content is wide and varied, from comparing vintage hairstyles, over rating deaf-inclusive children’s books, to explaining homophobia to toddlers. Many of her videos also feature her wife Claudia and their two-year old, Rupert. 

Jessica is a major voice in LGBTQIA+ online spaces.

FAQs

The most popular gay YouTubers out there are Greg and Mitch, Connor Franta, and MacDoesIt.

Among the biggest lesbian YouTubers are the couples Caitlin and Leah, Julie and Camilla, and Jessica Kellgren-Fozard.

The most popular trans YouTuber out there is Abigail Thorn, the creator behind Philosophy Tube.

Some of the most popular LGBTQ YouTubers are Greg and Mitch, Bretman Rock, LDShadowLady, and Tana Mongeau.

The biggest gay YouTubers who are currently active are Greg and Mitch.

Author

  • Alex Lefkowitz

    Alex Lefkowitz is the founder and CEO of Tasty Edits. He holds a BA in Entrepreneurship and is an experienced video editor, having edited hundreds of videos for dozens of creators before starting his own video editing company. Since launching Tasty Edits, he has directly managed thousands of video and thumbnail orders. Now, he draws on his experience working with professional creators to write about video editing, the creator economy, and video marketing. You can also read his work on Hackernoon and Medium. Plus, he's contributed several expert opinions in interviews and articles as a guest on platforms like Jotform.

    View all posts